March 2015: Lanyon Homestead

Lanyon is an historic homestead and grazing property located on the southern outskirts of Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory. It’s a fascinating place both for its history as an early homestead and as a case study for the management of historical homesteads as museums. As with many homesteads that have been occupied for long periods of time, each new head of the household at Lanyon made decisions about how they kept their house. Furnishing changed, the functions of rooms changed, rooms were added or taken away. When curating such a homestead, what story do you want to tell? Do you take everything back to one decade? Do you keep it as you have found it? The curators have gone to excruciating lengths to acquire objects and furniture that would likely have been in such a homestead during the 1860s. Where historical records and people’s memories of the place have allowed, they have tried to recreate some rooms exactly as they were during set times. I found the outcome of the two strategies very interesting.One of the things I really delighted in was the interpretation in the sheds out by the cafe – accounts from some of the people who laboured on the homestead. You can read more about the fascinating history of the homestead and its conservation management plan from the ACT’s Museums and Galleries website.

March 2015: Tuggeranong Homestead

Weddings are a fantastic excuse for a weekend away, catch up with old friends and generally eat cake, be merry and celebrate. The cast for this particular trip were the ladies from last year’s June trip to the Victorian Goldfields. The next couple of posts will be sharing the photos from our various jaunts around the Australian Capital Territory. Katie of Katie Writes Stuff once again acted as group photographer and scribe and has provided an account here on her delightful blog.

Today’s post: A morning at Tuggeranong Homestead. And what a fine homestead it was. You can read more about it’s history and role in the region at the homestead’s website. Many thanks to the owner who gave us an impromptu tour even though the homestead was closed to the public that day. I can imagine people have had some very beautiful weddings there.

The Mildura Arts Centre and the Rio Vista House

The roads (and planes) in my life often lead to Mildura on the banks of the Murray River. Population of around 30,000. Award winning vanilla slices, an excellent Thai restaurant, one of the many stomping grounds of Big Lizzie, riverboats, wine and all the amenities one needs to set out on an adventure to the Murray/Murrumbidgee/Darling Rivers wonderland. In a July visit this year, I visited the Rio Vista Homestead, once the home of the Chaffey Brothers and now a regional art gallery and museum. I learnt interesting things about irrigation, took in some art and then nursed a cup of tea as I read Mildura Living and eavesdropped on other people’s conversations.

IMG_2523

June 2014 – Kulcurna Station

Beaut lunch at Kulcurna Station, currently owned by the Hansens. Goat stew, golden syrup dumpling, river gums, the red cliffs of the Murray River.  Back in the day, one of the homestead owners developed drought resistant strains of wheat and put crops in the bed of the river during times of drought (Hansen 2010, Postcards SA). Sadly my camera died so no photos but you can check out Kulcurna’s blog or their photo  gallery or a Kulcurna postcard or sunphio’s Kulcurna flickr album